Tuck Tucker, President of Tucker Castleberry

Archive for the ‘Today in History’ Category

Today is “Brothers Day”

IMG_1443Image_00438Image_00253IMG_1265 Brother’s Day celebrates the bond between brothers – an amazing gift and should be cherished. Take this day to make contact with your brother and tell him how much he means to you. Why not arrange to take your brother out for a meal and discuss your family memories?

Brother’s Day should not be confused with Wright Brothers Day, which is observed in the USA in December to celebrate the iconic brothers who worked together to create the first heavier than air flying machine. This example of successful brotherhood shows just how amazing the brotherly connection can be.

Brothers Day

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Today, May 7th is…….

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ROAST LEG OF LAMB DAY !!!!

First Porsche completed today in 1948

On this day in 1948, a hand-built aluminum prototype labeled “No. 1” becomes the first vehicle to bear the name of one of the world’s leading luxury car manufacturers: Porsche.

D-Day…June 6, 1944

On this day in 1944, Supreme Allied Commander General Dwight Eisenhower gave the go-ahead for the largest amphibious military operation in history: Operation Overlord, code named D-Day, the Allied invasion of northern France.

By daybreak, 18,000 British and American parachutists were already on the ground. At 6:30 a.m., American troops came ashore at Utah and Omaha beaches. At Omaha, the U.S. First Division battled high seas, mist, mines, burning vehicles—and German coastal batteries, including an elite infantry division, which spewed heavy fire. Many wounded Americans ultimately drowned in the high tide. British divisions, which landed at Gold, Juno, and Sword beaches, and Canadian troops also met with heavy German fire, but by the end of the day they were able to push inland.

Despite the German resistance, Allied casualties overall were relatively light. The United States and Britain each lost about 1,000 men, and Canada 355. Before the day was over, 155,000 Allied troops would be in Normandy. However, the United States managed to get only half of the 14,000 vehicles and a quarter of the 14,500 tons of supplies they intended on shore.

Three factors were decisive in the success of the Allied invasion. First, German counterattacks were firm but sparse, enabling the Allies to create a broad bridgehead, or advanced position, from which they were able to build up enormous troop strength. Second, Allied air cover, which destroyed bridges over the Seine, forced the Germans to suffer long detours, and naval gunfire proved decisive in protecting the invasion troops. And third, division and confusion within the German ranks as to where the invasion would start and how best to defend their position helped the Allies. (Hitler, convinced another invasion was coming the next day east of the Seine River, refused to allow reserves to be pulled from that area.)

Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery, commander of Britain’s Twenty-first Army Group (but under the overall command of General Eisenhower, for whom Montgomery, and his ego, proved a perennial thorn in the side), often claimed later that the invasion had come off exactly as planned. That was a boast, as evidenced by the failure to take Caen on the first day, as scheduled. While the operation was a decided success, considering the number of troops put ashore and light casualties, improvisation by courageous and quick-witted commanders also played an enormous role.

God Bless America and those soldiers who fought to protect our country.

Today in History

Ronald Reagan died today in 2004:

On this day in 2004, Ronald Wilson Reagan, the 40th president of the United States.dies, after a long struggle with Alzheimer’s disease. Reagan, who was also a well-known actor and served as governor of California, was a popular president known for restoring American confidence after the problems of the 1970’s and helping to defeat communism.

Known as the Great Communicator, Reagan left the Oval Office as one of the most popular presidents in history, retiring to his much-loved California ranch, Rancho del Cielo. His announcement in 1994 that he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease was greeted with great sadness by many across the country. He wrote, in an open letter to the American people, I now begin the journey that will lead me into the sunset of my life. I know that for America there will always be a bright dawn ahead.

He lived out the rest of his days on the ranch, with his wife Nancy, who remained devoted to him to the end, by his side. He was buried at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California.

 

Robert Kennedy was assassinated today in 1968:

Senator Robert Kennedy is shot at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles after winning the California presidential primary. Immediately after he announced to his cheering supporters that the country was ready to end its fractious divisions, Kennedy was shot several times by the 22-year-old Palestinian Sirhan Sirhan. He died a day later.

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